Confusion about Occupation and complection


BlindGuyNW
BlindGuyNW's picture

Hi,
I'm new to Harnworld and Harn Master, having just become aware of them quite recently, and bought the recommended starting products yesterday. What I've been able to read so far I very much like, but there were a couple points which confused me.
The parental occupation table doesn't read very well with my screen reader. I realize I'm supposed to roll a d1000, but the way the PDF is layed out makes actually understanding which column of the table I'm in a frustrating proposition. The program insists on telling me about all the – symbols used presumably for layout, but I can't tell which of these are decorative and which suggest there's no entry in this particular column.
The complection table presents a similar problem. I can't figure out which result I should be reading. I suppose I can just pick one at random, but I'd rather try and use the rules as they're designed.
Any help in interpreting these tables or reformatting them somehow would be greatly appreciated. The PDFS are otherwise excellent: I particularly love the bookmarks.
Thanks much for any input,
Zack.

rbs
rbs's picture

Which screen reader?

Zack, Which screen reader are you using? I'm trying to use the Acrobat screen reader on that page but can only get bits and pieces of the content read out loud.

Anyway, there are 10 columns on the occupation table. The first 7 columns are labeled according to the cultural background of the character, presumably determined by the setting of one's fantasy campaign. You roll the d1000 and go down the appropriate column to find the matching numbers. Then go across to columns 8 and 9 to find the social status and occupation that match the roll. Finally, in column 10 is a percentage indicating the likelihood that the character lives in an urban situation.

For example, if I was rolling up a character from Kaldor or Chybisa or Melderyn, I would select the "Feudal" column. I get a good d1000 roll and come up with a 715. Going down the column I find "708-722" and then reading from there over to the right, I find that character's (parental) occupation is "hunter/trapper" and that there is only a 10% chance that he is "urban". I say "a good roll" because the table is set up to realistically generate a lot of farmers and other peasants.

The long dashes which appear in the first seven columns just mean that the occupation listed for the particular row over in column 9 is not appropriate to that culture. So for example, you are not going to randomly generate a Sinai (elven) thrall or slave.

The complexion table is set up similarly. There are 7 columns indicating racial background (5 of them for humans from differing climate regions). Roll d100 in the appropriate column and then read over to the skin coloring listed in column 8. Again, a long dash means that a particular complexion is not appropriate to that background.

BlindGuyNW
BlindGuyNW's picture

Jaws for Windows

Hi,
Thanks so much for the reply. I figured that was the general idea behind those tables, but was unable to make sense of my rolls due to the way Jaws presented them. The largest issue is that the PDF's "table" element only seems to encompass a portion of the actual contents of the table. Unfortunately, it's somewhat hard to explain how this sounds when read aloud, but it isn't comprehensible.
Jaws has a demo which can be found at www.freedomscientific.com, if you're interested in hearing how it reads. Note that this would require a bit of familiarity with the table navigation functions.
FOr now, I don't suppose it would be possible to get the tables in an alternate format? Something like an Excel spreadsheet would be ideal, as there wouldn't be any problem with PDF elements. The occupation and complection tables are merely two of the worst examples, this problem isn't specific to them alone.
THanks again for your help,
Zack.

rbs
rbs's picture

What about Word tables

Zack, Would tables in MS Word files serve, or is Excel easier for you to work with? I don't have access to the original source documents, but the Word vs. Excel issue may affect how easily it would be for KP to provide accessible tables.

BlindGuyNW
BlindGuyNW's picture

Either should do fine

Hi,
Thanks for getting back in touch. :) Either format should be quite reasonable, whatever would be easiest for you guys to produce. The help is very much appreciated.
Thanks much,
Zack.

Peter
Peter's picture

Accessible tables

It is possible to produce accessible versions of KP products.

In addition to tables, lists can also be an issue. Ideally a PDF document needs quite a bit to make into an accessible version but it is possible (PDF itself isn't inherently accessible).

Word documents are easier and if you have well designed templates that are created correctly it is very easy to ensure documents are accessible. Pdfs created from accessible word templates are pretty reasonable as well. I have been working in this area quite a bit of late. I am happy to assist if I can.

BlindGuyNW
BlindGuyNW's picture

APologies

I'm afraid I myself don't know much about the specifics of making PDF accessible, I've just seen good ones and bad. Kelestia's products are, on the whole, pretty good. I do wish I could read the maps though, but that's another story entirely. :)

Fástred
Fástred's picture

I'm working on an XLS file

Hi

I'm working on an XLS file of the Occupation Tables. Should have it done over this weekend.

Hopefully this will address this issue.

Regards

Jeremy

BlindGuyNW
BlindGuyNW's picture

THanks!

Hi Jeremy,
I look forward to seeing this whenever you manage to finish it. :) Your help is much appreciated. I'm not sure when I'll be able to play in or run Harn as a setting, but when I do I'm sure I'll find the tables useful.
Yours,
Zack.

Fástred
Fástred's picture

New Occupation Tables

Zack

Here are new tables:

http://www.kelestia.com/occupations

Please let me know if they work.

Regards

Jeremy


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