Recent comments

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    It depends how strict you want to be regarding interpretations, from a D&D point of view. I only know 3.5E, not Pathfinder, but Bardic magic there is Arcane rather than Divine; that would make Master Harpers (or, indeed, members of the Rydequelyn, the Save K'norian order you were thinking of) who dabble in Pvaric philosophy and 'magic' a better fit. It depends how seriously you take the Arcane/Divine split and how firmly you want to incorporate Hârnic/Pvaric systems of magic and thought.

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    It was nice of you not to point out that I misread both the a) Tulwyn and b) Gozyda articles, above:

    a) All of my careful math involving the differing number of tribes matters not a whit, since the "[t]olls collected are taken to the overchief [head of the leading tribe] who divides them fairly among the tribes." :/ On the plus side, this more careful second reading did let me notice that "to the east the Tulwyn avoid [sic] the southern reaches of the Gargun-infested Felsha mountains." According to the range map, the avoided portion is composed of the higher elevations. Thus - except in the event of swarms - there must not be *too* many Gargun normally encountered in the area of interest.

    b) The Gozyda are divided into three sub-nations, with the ranges of only two of these located along the Salt Route. As both sub-nations are composed of independent family units too small to threaten the large annual caravans, they don't figure into the math at all. Although they could prompt lesser mercantylers (those who would like to pursue out-of-season trade in caravans small enough to be vulnerable to Gozyda families) to seek an alternate route.

    And - yes - it would be a very hard scenario. So I think I'll wait until the party has a few Pathfinder levels under their collective belt, before I offer them this commission. Preferably, such a party would include a skilled Bard (for those difficult negotiations), as well.

    BTW, speaking of Bards . . .

    I'm thinking that (in Harnic terms) a Pathfinder/3.5 Bard would be - essentially - a priest of Save K'nor. After all, isn't Save K'nor the one who has that tale-spinning travelling minstrel - the one who uses a lute - as one of his demigods?

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    It was nice of you not to point out that I misread both the a) Tulwyn and b) Gozyda articles, above:

    a) All of my careful math involving the differing number of tribes matters not a whit, since the "[t]olls collected are taken to the overchief [head of the leading tribe] who divides them fairly among the tribes." :/ On the plus side, this more careful second reading did let me notice that "to the east the Tulwyn avoid [sic] the southern reaches of the Gargun-infested Felsha mountains." According to the range map, the avoided portion is composed of the higher elevations. Thus - except in the event of swarms - there must not be *too* many Gargun normally encountered in the area of interest.

    b) The Gozyda are divided into three sub-nations, with the ranges of only two of these located along the Salt Route. As both sub-nations are composed of independent family units too small to threaten the large annual caravans, they don't figure into the math at all. Although they could prompt lesser mercantylers (those who would like to pursue out-of-season trade in caravans small enough to be vulnerable to Gozyda families) to seek an alternate route.

    And - yes - it would be a very hard scenario. So I think I'll wait until the party has a few Pathfinder levels under their collective belt, before I offer them this commission. Preferably, such a party would include a skilled Bard (for those difficult negotiations), as well.

    BTW, speaking of Bards . . .

    I'm thinking that (in Harnic terms) a Pathfinder/3.5 Bard would be - essentially - a priest of Save K'nor. After all, isn't Save K'nor the one who has that tale-spinning travelling minstrel - the one who uses a lute - as one of his demigods?

  • New product release this weekend....   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Yes! I'm most eager to see it :-D

  • New product release this weekend....   6 years 47 weeks ago

    An imminent product is emanating!?

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    The Kirandar will be a major barrier. They are a 'leading' or 'sovereign' tribe with eight vassal tribes - by far the most powerful group.

    This project would not proceed without their agreement, I'd say. You'd also need to get the agreement of at least four other 'leading' tribes - the Tuga, the Shymor and/or the Caleff, and or the Targon.

    Sounds hard - but certainly a fun senario :)

    Jeremy

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    The Kirandar will be a major barrier. They are a 'leading' or 'sovereign' tribe with eight vassal tribes - by far the most powerful group.

    This project would not proceed without their agreement, I'd say. You'd also need to get the agreement of at least four other 'leading' tribes - the Tuga, the Shymor and/or the Caleff, and or the Targon.

    Sounds hard - but certainly a fun senario :)

    Jeremy

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    a) While it's certainly hilly, the particular coloration denoting "mountainous" is actually quite sparse and discontinous, in this particular area. And the existing Salt Route already goes through quite a bit of hilly terrain, although it admittedly stays to non-hilly patches whenever possible.

    b) While the map in the Tulwyn article shows the "lead tribe" of Kirandar holding the area including the first stretch of the route, the detail map of Tharda shows quite a few Corani settlements along the coast through there, extending quite a bit past the semi-circular "Tulwyn-Free Zone" (directly around Firis itself) that's seen on the Tulwyn map. The new route would pass through the narrowest extent of the Kirandar range (~7 miles), then through the middle of the Tuga (~20 miles) and Wylagor (~12 miles) ranges, then finally through the very tip (~3 miles) of the Targon range. While that's ~42 miles (through four tribal ranges), its still only about a third as long as the ~125 miles (through eight tribal ranges) that it already crosses to reach the same point. And it avoids the Gozyda (~40 miles and four tribal ranges) entirely. Altogether, I make that quite a bit of "let up." At the least, that's only four (4) sovereign tribes to bribe, rather than twelve (12). :)

    c) The Gargun could be a problem (although the Gargun complication may not occur to Harnic traders, unless the approximate location of Korego is actually known in-game). On the other hand, the existence of the Korego Gargun could actually be a help, at least in initially negotiating the new route with the Tulwyn. If pitched in the right way, a fort at the route's mid-point could be seen as an aid to the Tulwyn, in stopping Gargun swarms from reaching the heart of their territory. Of course, this still leaves the Mylmoc (whose range is entirely north of the route, on the western slope of the Felshas, between it and Korego) swinging in the breeze, Gargun-wise. But the Mylmoc are also one of the sovereign tribes which currently get no share in the Salt Route bribes . . . so my above should be corrected to "five (5) sovereign tribes to bribe, rather than twelve (12)." :)

    d) Further bonding taxes or wharfage fees would be necessary only if the craft stopped and/or unloaded at towns along the way. There's no need for them to do either (when stopping overnight they could tie off to a tree few miles up-/down-stream or even simply anchor mid-stream) - although the local authorities could always try to make them tie up to a "proper" dock, in the interests of "safety." I expect that the Merchantyler's Guild would strongly object to such attempts.

    e) As you say, tradition is a strong and often overlooked force. But it's perhaps rather less strong in the Thardic Republic than in a feudal society. Events in the Republic seem to be driven much more by open greed . . . and shortening the Salt Route would save a lot of people money. Of course, it would also cost other people that same money. The phrase "it depends on how much and whose money" comes to mind . . .

    By the way, the Tharda map show's a legionary fort (1 company) at Estane as the easternmost settlement. It's located only about a mile or so from the extreme east-southeasternmost point of the Lake. And a couple of large stream beds are shown heading uphill almost directly east - going off the map - at that point. Blazing the trail would thus likely be fairly simple: follow one of these streams to it's origin point, keep going east until you locate another stream's origin point and finally follow this downhill til you reach the Farin.

    Sounds like a job that even the most dense PC party could handle . . . assuming they survive, of course. :)

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    a) While it's certainly hilly, the particular coloration denoting "mountainous" is actually quite sparse and discontinous, in this particular area. And the existing Salt Route already goes through quite a bit of hilly terrain, although it admittedly stays to non-hilly patches whenever possible.

    b) While the map in the Tulwyn article shows the "lead tribe" of Kirandar holding the area including the first stretch of the route, the detail map of Tharda shows quite a few Corani settlements along the coast through there, extending quite a bit past the semi-circular "Tulwyn-Free Zone" (directly around Firis itself) that's seen on the Tulwyn map. The new route would pass through the narrowest extent of the Kirandar range (~7 miles), then through the middle of the Tuga (~20 miles) and Wylagor (~12 miles) ranges, then finally through the very tip (~3 miles) of the Targon range. While that's ~42 miles (through four tribal ranges), its still only about a third as long as the ~125 miles (through eight tribal ranges) that it already crosses to reach the same point. And it avoids the Gozyda (~40 miles and four tribal ranges) entirely. Altogether, I make that quite a bit of "let up." At the least, that's only four (4) sovereign tribes to bribe, rather than twelve (12). :)

    c) The Gargun could be a problem (although the Gargun complication may not occur to Harnic traders, unless the approximate location of Korego is actually known in-game). On the other hand, the existence of the Korego Gargun could actually be a help, at least in initially negotiating the new route with the Tulwyn. If pitched in the right way, a fort at the route's mid-point could be seen as an aid to the Tulwyn, in stopping Gargun swarms from reaching the heart of their territory. Of course, this still leaves the Mylmoc (whose range is entirely north of the route, on the western slope of the Felshas, between it and Korego) swinging in the breeze, Gargun-wise. But the Mylmoc are also one of the sovereign tribes which currently get no share in the Salt Route bribes . . . so my above should be corrected to "five (5) sovereign tribes to bribe, rather than twelve (12)." :)

    d) Further bonding taxes or wharfage fees would be necessary only if the craft stopped and/or unloaded at towns along the way. There's no need for them to do either (when stopping overnight they could tie off to a tree few miles up-/down-stream or even simply anchor mid-stream) - although the local authorities could always try to make them tie up to a "proper" dock, in the interests of "safety." I expect that the Merchantyler's Guild would strongly object to such attempts.

    e) As you say, tradition is a strong and often overlooked force. But it's perhaps rather less strong in the Thardic Republic than in a feudal society. Events in the Republic seem to be driven much more by open greed . . . and shortening the Salt Route would save a lot of people money. Of course, it would also cost other people that same money. The phrase "it depends on how much and whose money" comes to mind . . .

    By the way, the Tharda map show's a legionary fort (1 company) at Estane as the easternmost settlement. It's located only about a mile or so from the extreme east-southeasternmost point of the Lake. And a couple of large stream beds are shown heading uphill almost directly east - going off the map - at that point. Blazing the trail would thus likely be fairly simple: follow one of these streams to it's origin point, keep going east until you locate another stream's origin point and finally follow this downhill til you reach the Farin.

    Sounds like a job that even the most dense PC party could handle . . . assuming they survive, of course. :)

  • Chéler Index   6 years 47 weeks ago
    Yes

    Yes - any future updates will have a different version number.

    We will also notify people of updates on the News page and on HarnForum.

    Regards

    Jeremy

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    There are several reasons why this probably hasn't happened:

    a) the land east of Firis is quite hilly / mountainous. Its basically a southwestern spur of the Felsha mountains.

    b) the Tulwyn occupy much of this land. So no let up there.

    c) that region is close to the range of the Korego gargun. Tulwyn+Gargun... fearful combination!

    d) the main trade route is from Coranan. If it goes north via Shiran, then further bonding taxes would have to be paid.

    e) tradition.... a much underestimated rationale.

    Doesn't mean someone might not have a go at forging such a trail... but it wouldn't be easy!

  • Firis & Points East   6 years 47 weeks ago

    There are several reasons why this probably hasn't happened:

    a) the land east of Firis is quite hilly / mountainous. Its basically a southwestern spur of the Felsha mountains.

    b) the Tulwyn occupy much of this land. So no let up there.

    c) that region is close to the range of the Korego gargun. Tulwyn+Gargun... fearful combination!

    d) the main trade route is from Coranan. If it goes north via Shiran, then further bonding taxes would have to be paid.

    e) tradition.... a much underestimated rationale.

    Doesn't mean someone might not have a go at forging such a trail... but it wouldn't be easy!

  • Chéler Index   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Hello,
    will this guide have a new version number each time it is updated?

    Allan

  • Welcome to the updated site!   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Personally I like the new palate - it seems in keeping with the feel of the Chelembic and Harnic material. I don't recall any particular navigation problems with the old build, but this new one seems fine in that regard too. So a thumbs up from me. I liked the image on the 'under construction page', by the way.....

  • Welcome to the updated site!   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Personally I like the new palate - it seems in keeping with the feel of the Chelembic and Harnic material. I don't recall any particular navigation problems with the old build, but this new one seems fine in that regard too. So a thumbs up from me. I liked the image on the 'under construction page', by the way.....

  • Changing avatar image   6 years 47 weeks ago

    When was that photo taken, Robert?

    J.

  • Changing avatar image   6 years 47 weeks ago

    When was that photo taken, Robert?

    J.

  • Changing avatar image   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Woo-hoo. New site implementation let me change my avatar image.

  • Changing avatar image   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Woo-hoo. New site implementation let me change my avatar image.

  • Welcome to the updated site!   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Hrafn

    Thanks for the positive comments - the coding errors are my fault, as I pushed Jan to "go live" probably faster than he would have liked... I wanted the new site ready for a pretty important new product coming out 'real soon' :)

    Cheers

    Jeremy

  • Welcome to the updated site!   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Hrafn

    Thanks for the positive comments - the coding errors are my fault, as I pushed Jan to "go live" probably faster than he would have liked... I wanted the new site ready for a pretty important new product coming out 'real soon' :)

    Cheers

    Jeremy

  • Welcome to the updated site!   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Sounds like you are really enjoying "dusting things off" - sounds like its literally!

    Have a look around at the new material - you may particularly find the Harn Interactive map interesting...

    Cheers

    Jeremy

  • Welcome to the updated site!   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Sounds like you are really enjoying "dusting things off" - sounds like its literally!

    Have a look around at the new material - you may particularly find the Harn Interactive map interesting...

    Cheers

    Jeremy

  • Welcome to the updated site!   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Obviously not hard enough. ;-)

    The source code is a mess. ;-) The (X)HTML is invalid.

    Tastes are different, I find the new colour scheme a bit boring. Some colour for highlights could be useful.

    Otherwise the site is nicely structured.

    Oh, and you perhaps want to think about modifying the website to work well on mobile devices.

    Building websites today is not as easy as it was ten years ago.

    BTW, I just discovered the part about the fanon license. Fair stuff IMO. :-D

  • Welcome to the updated site!   6 years 47 weeks ago

    Obviously not hard enough. ;-)

    The source code is a mess. ;-) The (X)HTML is invalid.

    Tastes are different, I find the new colour scheme a bit boring. Some colour for highlights could be useful.

    Otherwise the site is nicely structured.

    Oh, and you perhaps want to think about modifying the website to work well on mobile devices.

    Building websites today is not as easy as it was ten years ago.

    BTW, I just discovered the part about the fanon license. Fair stuff IMO. :-D


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